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Book Excerpt: America's Addiction to Terrorism

Michael D. Yates, Monthly Review Press Book Excerpt Monthly Review
The following excerpt is the Foreword to America's Addiction to Terrorism. Portside is pleased to share this with our readers. In the U.S. today, the term "terrorism" conjures up images of dangerous, outside threats: religious extremists and suicide bombers in particular. Harder to see but all the more pervasive is the terrorism perpetuated by the United States, itself, whether through military force overseas or woven into the very fabric of society at home.

labor

Adjunct Professors say They've Become the 'Temp Workers' of College Classrooms

Maura Lerner StarTribune
Adjunct professors make $18,000 to $30,000 for the equivalent of full-time work; compared to tenure track professors, who earn $68,000 to $116,000 (plus benefits), according to the American Association of University Professors. Only three in 10 professors are tenured today, down from six in 10 in the 1970s. Recently, frustrations over the plight of adjuncts have boiled over in congressional hearings, online petitions and a two-day walkout at the University of Illinois.

Friday Nite Videos -- October 4, 2013

Portside
Shutstorm 2013: Bias on Bulls**t Mountain. Gimme Shelter | Playing for Change. Hijacking Prison Phone Calls for Profit. 100K Poets for Change. The Joy of Teaching -- Office Hours. Victor Jara's Last Song.

The Joys of Teaching

If you've ever TA'd or taught a class, this video is for you. The PHD Movie was filmed on location at the California Institute of Technology, and features real grad students, undergrads and professors

Camouflaging the Vietnam War: How Textbooks Continue to Keep the Pentagon Papers a Secret

Bill Bigelow Zinn Education Project - If We Knew Our History Series
The Pentagon Papers that Ellsberg exposed were not military secrets. They were historical secrets - a history of U.S. intervention and deceit that Ellsberg believed, if widely known, would undermine the U.S. pretexts in defense of the war's prosecution. Like today's whistle-blowers Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden, Daniel Ellsberg knew the consequences for his act of defiance. He was indicted on 11 counts of theft and violation of the Espionage Act.
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