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New U.N. Report Shows Just How Awful Globalization and Informal Employment Are for Workers

Elizabeth Grossman Working In These Times
An estimated 60.7 percent of the world’s workers labor in the informal economy, without legal or social protections. While the impact of working without the freedom to organize is most dire in the world’s poorest countries, U.S. workers are not an exception to the types of labor rights abuses the described in a United Nations Report.

U.N. Reveals ‘Alarmingly High’ Levels of Violence Against Women

Somini Sengupta New York Times
Violence against women — including rape, murder and sexual harassment — remains stubbornly high in countries rich and poor, at war and at peace. One recent study found that domestic violence against women and children alone costs the global economy $4 trillion.

New Report Says U.S. Health Care Violates U.N. Convention on Racism

Miriam Zoila Pérez Colorlines
Recent policy developments, primarily the Affordable Care Act's Medicaid expansion, have the potential to improve access to health care for women who aren't eligible for Medicaid under current requirements. But 19 states, including most in the South where maternal mortality rates are higher, have opted out of Medicaid expansion. Georgia, for example, has 838,000 uninsured women, more than 25 percent of whom are African American.

Five Israeli Talking Points on Gaza-Debunked

Noura Erakat The Nation
UN estimates more than 74 percent of those killed are civilians - in a population of 1.8 million where the number of Hamas members is approximately 15,000. Israel does not deny that it killed those using modern aerial technology and precise weaponry courtesy of the U.S. This is not the first time. The gruesome images of decapitated children's bodies and stolen innocence on Gaza's shores are a dreadful repeat of Israel's assault on Gaza in November 2012 and winter 2008-09

Haiti’s Doctored Elections

Dan Beeton and Georgianne Nienaber Dissent
An interview: In his new book, Haiti: Dilemas e Fracassos Internacionais (“International Crossroads and Failures in Haiti,” ), Seitenfus takes a long view of the electoral crisis that he witnessed in 2010. In his account, Haiti’s tragedy began over two centuries ago in 1804, when the country committed what Seitenfus terms its “original sin,” an unpardonable act of lèse-majesté: it became the first (and only) independent nation to emerge from a slave rebellion.

At the UN, a Latin American Rebellion

Laura Carlsen Foreign Policy in Focus
Latin American leaders are reclaiming a right to differentiate their views from Washington's—and refusing to render it diplomatic tribute.
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