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A Washington Echo Chamber for a New Cold War

Cassandra Stimpson and Holly Zhang TomDispatch
demonstrator with protest sign A Rising China Lifts All Boats (Submarines, Aircraft Carriers, and Surface Ships), Not to Speak of Fighter Planes, in the Military-Industrial Complex.

Older Workers Can’t Work From Home and Are At a Higher Risk For COVID-19

Elise Gould Economic Policy Institute
Nearly three-fourths of workers age 65 and older—over 5 million older workers—are unable to telecommute. That means that these workers, who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19, could be putting themselves at risk to earn a paycheck.

HypersonicWeapons and National (In)security: Why Arms Races Never End

Rajan Menon Tom Dispatch
Lockheed hypersonic missle Hypersonic weapons close in on their targets at a minimum speed of Mach 5, five times the speed of sound or 3,836.4 miles an hour. They are among the latest entrants in an arms competition that has embroiled the United States for generations...

Universal Basic Income Is Easier Than It Looks

Ellen Brown The Web of Debt Blog
The pros and cons of a UBI are hotly debated and have been discussed elsewhere. The point here is to show that it could actually be funded year after year without driving up taxes or prices.

Household Debt: How the Bottom Half Bolsters the Booming U.S. Economy

Jonathan Spicer Reuters
Delinquent Auto Loans Chart The U.S. economy is booming. But the dramatic increase in jobs isn’t increasing wages and the growth in consumer spending has primarily been fueled by the bottom 60 percent of earners, who are exhausting their savings and piling up serious debt.

The Healthy D.C. Economy is Leaving Behind Longtime Black Residents, New Study Finds

Perry Stein Washington Post
Half of all new jobs in Washington, DC will require at least a bachelor's degree, although only 12.3 percent of Black residents in 2014 had graduated from college. And, now that wealthier residents have moved back to cities, rent increases have left longtime residents unable to afford their homes.
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