Skip to main content

Information is power. Our mission at Portside is to seek out and to provide information that empowers you -- that empowers the left. Every day we search hundreds of sources to connect you with the most interesting, striking and useful material. Just once a year we appeal to you to contribute to make it possible to continue this work. Please help.

 

 

 

Behind Fascist Balbo Monument, a History of Multiracial Resistance

Curtis Black Chicago Reporter
A Chicago Tribune feature story last week mentioned in passing “mainstream supporters” of Italian fascism in 1930s Chicago; indeed, Chicago Mayor Edward Kelly appears to have been an enthusiastic fan of Mussolini. But we should also remember the courageous anti-fascist organizing in Chicago at the time by Italian Americans and African Americans, who drew explicit connections between the fascist ideology being celebrated and the racist and repressive system existing here

Black Women’s Equal Pay Day

Valerie Wilson, Janelle Jones, Kayla Blado, and Elise Gould Economic Policy Institute
July 31st is Black Women’s Equal Pay Day, the day that marks how long into 2017 an African American woman would have to work in order to be paid the same wages as her white male counterpart was paid last year.

Mississippi Autoworkers Mobilize

Michelle Chen Dissent
The standoff in the deep South between a black working-class community and a global auto giant reflects a broader anti-Trump resistance emerging in the labor movement, fueled by frustration with the empty promises of neoliberal “development” policies.

Ebony Pushes Black journalists' Patience to the Limit

Adeshina Emmanuel Columbia Journalism Review
A lot of Black people love Ebony. But love only goes so far for the journalists who make it happen, especially when the object of your affection is slow to cut you a check. Start by paying your damn journalists.

Why He Was in Memphis

Peter Dreier Huffington Post
King went to Memphis to support African American garbage workers, who were on strike to protest unsafe conditions, abusive white supervisors, and low wages -- and to gain recognition for their union. Their picket signs relayed a simple but profound message: "I Am A Man."
Subscribe to African American