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The War on Terror Was Corrupt From the Start

Farah Stockman New York Times
The war in Afghanistan wasn’t a failure. It was a massive success — for those who made a fortune off it. Instead of a nation, what we really built were more than 500 military bases — and the personal fortunes of the people who supplied them.

The Costs of Post-9/11 Wars Exceed $8 Trillion for U.S.

Alexa Gagosz Boston Globe
In just 20 years, the total cost of the US increasing homeland security and waging wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and elsewhere since Sept. 11, 2001, have exceeded $8 trillion, according to new estimates by the Costs of War project at Brown University.

Demilitarizing Our Democracy

Mandy Smithberger and William Hartung TomDispatch
arial view of Pentagon How the National Security State Has Come to Dominate a "Civilian" Government

The Pentagon Took Money for PPE and Bought Weapons

Phyllis Bennis Foreign Policy in Focus
sewing a mask The military says that the “health” of the defense industry is crucial to national security. But the CARES Act money was specifically allocated to protect the health of the people of this country — not the companies that build weapons.

National (In)Security and the Pentagon Budget

Mandy Smithberger TomDispatch
A Post-Coronavirus economy can no longer afford to put the Pentagon first. As it turns out, creating jobs through Pentagon spending is among the least effective ways to rebuild the economy.

HypersonicWeapons and National (In)security: Why Arms Races Never End

Rajan Menon Tom Dispatch
Lockheed hypersonic missle Hypersonic weapons close in on their targets at a minimum speed of Mach 5, five times the speed of sound or 3,836.4 miles an hour. They are among the latest entrants in an arms competition that has embroiled the United States for generations...
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