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Media Bits and Bytes - November 5, 2019

Political Ads on Social Media * Tech Workers vs ICE * Facial Recognition Lawsuit * NYT Normalizes Trump * Indian American Press Joins MSM * Feds Investigate TikTok * Cryptocurrency from Russia

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Protesting Amazon in New York City, Photo: Huiying B. Chan/Daily Koz

 

Twitter, Facebook, and Political Ads

Take 1: Twitter's Double Standard 
By Natasha Lomas, November 2, 2019, TeleCrunch

Take 2: Facebook and the UK Election 
By Leighton Andrews, October 31, 2019, Open Democracy

 

Tech Workers Take Action Against ICE

By Lauren Kaori Gurley
October 31, 2019
Vice

More than 200 employees at the Seattle-based data visualization company Tableau publicly called out their employer for the first time this week, demanding it cut ties with ICE and CBP.

ACLU Sues Over Facial Recognition Tech

By Drew Harwell 
October 31, 2019
Washington Post

The American Civil Liberties Union sued the Justice Department, the Drug Enforcement Administration and the FBI, arguing that the agencies have secretly implemented a nationwide surveillance technology that threatens Americans’ privacy and civil rights.

Normalizing Trump

By Dorothee Benz
November 1, 2019
FAIR

Again and again during Trump’s presidency, corporate media have fallen over themselves to find acceptable ways to describe utterly unacceptable behavior, policies and decisions—none more so than the New York Times.

Indian Country Today Joins AP

By Valerie Vande Panne
October 28, 2019
Columbia Journalism Review

In a first, when Indian Country Today picks up a tribal newspaper’s story, they can not only run it on their own website, but also make it available to the AP and, through them, to the nation’s newspapers.

Feds Investigating TikTok

By Greg Roumeliotis, Yingzhi Yang, Echo Wang, and Alexandra Alper
November 1, 2019
Reuters

The U.S. government has launched a national security review of TikTok owner Beijing ByteDance Technology Co’s $1 billion acquisition of U.S. social media app Musical.ly. U.S. lawmakers have been concerned the Chinese company may be censoring politically sensitive content, and raising questions about how it stores personal data.

Cryptocurrency from Russia

By Hannah Lucinda Smith
October 29, 2019
Wired

Dodgy energy deals, loose regulation, and dubious characters—with links to the Hillary Clinton email hackers—are fueling a burgeoning crypto industry that could provide an end run around US sanctions.