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Creating an Ecological Society: Toward a Revolutionary Transformation

Sean Ledwith Counterfire
A first-rate compendium of environmental sanity, the book under review is also a sound, radical and compelling critique of capitalist planning, making the case that only a revolutionary transformation on socialist principles can generate the political framework needed to save the planet.

'Tomorrow is Too Late' -- When Fidel Castro Urged Urgent Climate Action at the 1992 Rio Summit

Fidel Castro Climate & Capitalism
The United Nations Earth Summit in 1992 took place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and was supposed to establish guidelines for sustainable development. At the Summit, then Cuban President Fidel Castro gave a speech (short), warning of the dire consequences of failing to reverse course. Castro long warned that capitalism was threatening to destroy human civilization through ecological destruction, with the poor of the global South its first victims. Speech reprinted below.

We’re (Not) Running Out of Water – A Better Way to Measure Water Scarcity

Kate Brauman The Conversation
Managing water to meet current and future demand is critical. Biophysical indicators, such as the ones we looked at, can’t tell us where a water shortage is stressful to society or ecosystems, but a good biophysical indicator can help us make useful comparisons, target interventions, evaluate risk and look globally to find management models that might work at home.

books

Marxism and Ecology: Common Fonts of a Great Transition (long)

John Bellamy Foster Great Transition Initiative
Socialist thought is re-emerging at the forefront of the movement for global ecological and social change. In the face of the planetary emergency, theorists have unearthed a powerful ecological critique of capitalism at the foundations of Marx's materialist conception of history. This has led to a more comprehensive conception of socialism rooted in Marx's analysis of the rift in "the universal metabolism of nature" and his vision of sustainable human development.

How Wolves Change Rivers

What happened when wolves were reintroduced into Yellowstone National Park in 1995 -- a cascade that embraced animals, plants, birds and even the earth itself.

books

From Good Ole Boy to Progressive Activist: One Man's Story

Eleanor J. Bader, Truthout Book Review Truthout
Born into the segregated rural South, James Gustave ("Gus") Speth didn't see the oppression and poverty his black neighbors faced. A confrontation at a northern university with civil-rights advocates in the early 1960s triggered a life-long moral compulsion to support the burgeoning civil rights struggle. The newly minted anti-racist grew into a leading environmentalist, political activist, prolific author and Yale dean. The book under review is his memoir.

When Large Birds Disappear, Rainforests Suffer

Rachel Nuwer Smithsonian Magazine
By the time people realized there was value in keeping the forest around, nearly 90 percent of it had been lost. Much of what remains today occurs in isolated, random pockets. For those smaller jungle patches the choices long-dead humans made may lead to complete collapse of some of the world’s most diverse sections of rainforest. Like a real-life game of Jenga, birds could prove to be the key piece that causes the entire jungle system to fall down.
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