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California’s Apocalyptic ‘Second Nature’

Mike Davis Rose Luxemburg Stiftung NYC Blog
Lake Fire in California Fire in the Anthropocene has become the physical equivalent of endless nuclear war. A new, profoundly sinister nature is rapidly emerging from our fire rubble at the expense of landscapes we once considered sacred.

COVID-19 and Circuits of Capital

Rob Wallace, Alex Liebman, Luis Fernando Chaves and Rodrick Wallace Monthly Review
The way out is nothing short of birthing a world (or perhaps more along the lines of returning back to Earth). It will also help solve—sleeves rolled up—many of our most pressing problems.

books

From Marx to Ecosocialism

Michael Löwy New Politics
A red and green upsurge is challenging capital internationally. The two books under review outline its thinking, chart its course and weigh its prospects.

poetry

Invasive Species

Amit Majmudar Massachusetts Review
Taking a global perspective, Ohio poet Amit Majmudar masterfully links issues of ecology and refugees.

books

Creating an Ecological Society: Toward a Revolutionary Transformation

Sean Ledwith Counterfire
A first-rate compendium of environmental sanity, the book under review is also a sound, radical and compelling critique of capitalist planning, making the case that only a revolutionary transformation on socialist principles can generate the political framework needed to save the planet.

'Tomorrow is Too Late' -- When Fidel Castro Urged Urgent Climate Action at the 1992 Rio Summit

Fidel Castro Climate & Capitalism
The United Nations Earth Summit in 1992 took place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and was supposed to establish guidelines for sustainable development. At the Summit, then Cuban President Fidel Castro gave a speech (short), warning of the dire consequences of failing to reverse course. Castro long warned that capitalism was threatening to destroy human civilization through ecological destruction, with the poor of the global South its first victims. Speech reprinted below.

We’re (Not) Running Out of Water – A Better Way to Measure Water Scarcity

Kate Brauman The Conversation
Managing water to meet current and future demand is critical. Biophysical indicators, such as the ones we looked at, can’t tell us where a water shortage is stressful to society or ecosystems, but a good biophysical indicator can help us make useful comparisons, target interventions, evaluate risk and look globally to find management models that might work at home.
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