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The People Who Make Your Favorite Movies and Shows Are Fed Up

Shirley Li The Atlantic
If you watch television, or films, you should think about who is making them and under what conditions. Eighteen-hour workdays, no lunch breaks. Car accidents caused by sleep deprivation. A crew member who returned to set the day after a miscarriage.

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Martinez-Cuevas: Reckoning with Labor Law’s Racist Roots

Marina Multhaup onLabor
Workers working in the fields. The Washington Supreme Court is currently deliberating a case that could have major economic effects for our most vulnerable workers while beginning to unravel one long-standing piece of our nation’s white supremacist history.

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Elder Care Homes Rake in Profits as Workers Earn a Pittance

Jennifer Gollan Associated Press
Residential senior care homes profit handsomely by paying their workers poverty wages. The profit margins can be huge and, for violators of labor laws, hinge on the widespread exploitation of thousands of caretakers, many of them poor

Who Controls Our Time?

Dan Clawson and Naomi Gerstel Labor Notes
Whether we’re fighting for a contract or a law, we should frame every time-related fight as part of the same vision—that workers own our time.

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It Ain't Over Till it's Over

Kathy Wilkes Isthmus
In May, the Supreme Court rejected a class action suit brought by Epic workers, effectively limiting the collective bargaining rights of 60 million workers. But the case — now back in district court — is far from dead.

The GOP’s Overtime Reform Plan: Fraud Masquerading as Flexibility

Justin Miller The American Prospect
Amid endless political cacophony in Washington, D.C., House Republicans are quietly advancing legislation that would drive a freight train through a central tenet of New Deal-era labor law: overtime. With Obama’s landmark overtime expansion blocked in the courts, conservatives roll out a plan that would undo overtime pay as we know it.

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The Next Big Fight Among Democrats?

Greg Sargent The Washington Post
Progressive Senators who have already criticized the administration on other economic issues — Sherrod Brown, Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders, Tom Harkin — wrote a letter last spring to Obama, applauding his decision to revisit overtime pay. But in their letter, the liberal Senators also set forth their desired threshold: Around $54,000 per year, rather than $42,000, the amount the Obama administration is supposedly eying.
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