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Unions and the Gig-Economy: The Case of AirBnB

Steven Tufts Socialist Project
The so-called gig-economy is celebrated, maligned, fetishized, and qualified by analysts. Whether it is called the collaborative, platform, crowd-sourcing, or sharing-economy, the rise of peer-to-peer exchanges does raise important questions for workers. Do emerging ‘sharing-economy’ platforms such as Uber and Airbnb mark a significant shift in production and distribution systems? Are they emancipatory or exploitive?


There is Life After Uber

Sam Levin The Guardian
After London stripped the service of its license, stories from Austin, Alaska and Denmark offer a preview of what could be next for the city’s transportation.


Disrupt the Citizen: Against Ride Sharing

Nikil Saval n+1
The removal of a single toxic CEO, like the condemning of a single home in the wake of a chemical leak, won’t make the region livable.

The Gig Economy Celebrates Working Yourself to Death

Jia Tolentino The New Yorker
The American obsession with self-reliance, which makes it more acceptable to applaud an individual for working oneself to death than to argue that an individual working her/himself to death is evidence of a flawed economic system. The contrast between the gig economy’s rhetoric (everyone is always connecting, having fun, and killing it!) and the conditions that allow it to exist (a lack of dependable employment that pays a living wage) makes this kink especially clear.


How Trade Unions Pulled the Brakes on Uber’s Bid to Enter Tokyo

Nithin Coca Equal Times
Japanese unions worked together to protest, lobby and organize and keep Uber out of Tokyo. They know Uber will continue to fight, so the battle is not over, but this example shows that unions can challenge the company and win.
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