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How Ending DACA Hurts All Low-Wage Workers

Daniel Costa Working Economics Blog of the Economic Policy Institute.
The impact of this political decision is significant: 800,000 young immigrants—many of whom have never known another country except when they were small children—will become instantly deportable and lose the ability to work legally and contribute to the United States, and will be effectively left without labor rights and employment law protections in the workplace.

An Underground College for Undocumented Immigrants

Jonathan Blitzer The New Yorker
In Georgia, undocumented students are barred from the state’s top public schools. Together, students and professors decided to start a freedom school to help fill the academic void. By consensus, the group chose the name Freedom University. It recalled the activism of the past, and, on T-shirts, it also made for a gratifying taunt: “F.U. Georgia.”

What Donald Trump Can and Can't Do to Immigrants

David Bacon NACLA Newsletter
Donald Trump's draconian immigration enforcement efforts face a basic challenge: the United States operates within an economic system that profits off immigrant labor. Immigrant labor is more vital to many industries than it's ever been before. Today, about 57% of the country's entire agricultural workforce is undocumented. But the list of other industries dependent on immigrant labor is long.

Marchers Across the Country Turn Out In Support of Immigration Reform

Oliver Ortega The Progressive
Fear and uncertainty punctuated immigrant rights rallies across the country, as speakers shared their worries about the future of the country. Actions occurring simultaneously in fifty cities in the first large-scale immigration demonstration since the election.

A Radical Proposal for Radical Times

Aviva Chomsky NACLA
Amidst a national flurry of immigrant rights initiatives, the Immigrant Worker Center Collaborative of Boston (IWCC) came up with a proposal that was radical in its simplicity: a demand that President Obama pardon all undocumented people in the United States.

Being Undocumented in College Is Already Hard, and About to Get Harder

Lena Jackson Truthout
In 2012, President Obama passed DACA, a legislative policy to ensure that certain undocumented immigrants to the United States who entered the country before their 16th birthday and before June 2007 receive a renewable two-year work permit, a Social Security Number and exemption from deportation. Donald Trump has vowed to end DACA once he enters office, making hundreds of thousands of young people fearful of deportation and that their education could be in jeopardy.
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