Skip to main content

Dispatches From the Culture Wars - October 29, 2019

Witches, Prophets, Katie Hill, Superheroes, Militarism, Must-Reads for Fash, Spat-on Teachers, Georgia Book Burners, and Rent Control in Cali

printer friendly  
Jendy Barnes (red hat on left) was marching Wednesday near the Board of Trade when someone spit on her and other teachers, she said, Photo: Block Club Chicago

 

All Organizing is Magic

By Sarah Jaffe
October 25, 2019
Verso Books

Echoes of witchcraft in contemporary anti-capitalism.

 

Bernie’s Call to Solidarity

By Eoin Higgins
October 21, 2019
Common Dreams

"There is an America that most people believe in. It is an ideal. It's not a reality yet."

The Katie Hill Case

By Elizabeth Anora
October 28, 2019
The Independent

Katie Hill wasn't held accountable for her actions. She was thrown on a pyre for the benefit of men.

The Superhero Backlash

By Steve Rose
October 23, 2019
The Guardian

As they are attacked by film-makers like Martin Scorsese, are TV and movie superheroes fighting a losing battle against reality?

The Militarization of Everything

By William J. Astore
October 24, 2019
TomDispatch

Militarism is more than thuggish dictators, predatory weaponry, and steely-eyed troops. There are softer forms of it that are no less significant than the “hard” ones.

The Far Right’s Literary Canon

By Ian Allen
October 1, 2019
The New Republic

When Trump tweets about "civil war," he's echoing books about race wars and nationalist coups that a violent fringe has long cherished.

Spitting On Teachers

By Kelly Bauer
October 24, 2019
Block Club Chicago

Not everyone is a fan of the strike — but several people working in the Board of Trade building took their opposition too far Wednesday, teachers say: They spat on picketing teachers.

Burning Books in Georgia

By Kelly McCarthy
October 11, 2019
ABC News

Author Jennine Capó Crucet responds after white college students burn her book.

Winning Rent Control in California

By Peter Dreier
September 25, 2019
The American Prospect

Long a community with little clout, the state’s renters won a victory with national implications.