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How Robo-Callers Outwitted the Government and Completely Wrecked the Do Not Call List

Simon van Zuylen-Wood Washington Post
In 2015, the call-blocking app YouMail estimated that close to a billion robo-calls were being placed every month. Two years later, that number has leapt to 2.5 billion. At best, these calls annoy. At worst, they defraud. By far, they constitute the top consumer complaint received by the FTC.

There Is Still Hope - Even for Me

Edward Snowden, Martin Knobbe, Jörg Schindler Spiegel online
In an interview, whistleblower Edward Snowden discusses his life in Russia, the power of the intelligence apparatuses and how he will continue his battle against all-encompassing surveillance by governments.

Trump/Nunes Story Gets Weirder

Plus, Seth takes a closer look at Trump and the GOP's plan to allow Internet companies to sell people's Internet data.

Senate Republicans Just Sold You Out to Advertisers

Sam Biddle The Intercept
In a 50-to-48 vote along party lines, the U.S. Senate decided to kill FCC rules blocking your ISP from selling your browsing history to the advertising industry without permission. ISPs would not only be able to commodify your browser history, but “[hijack] their customers’ search queries and [redirect] them to a place customers hadn’t asked for” and “inject ads into your traffic based on your browsing history.

Three Myths the Telecom Industry is Using to Convince Congress to Repeal the FCC’s Privacy Rules, Busted

E. Falcon, J. Gillula, C. McSherry, K. Tummarello Electronic Frontier Foundation
(Fair warning: some of these are fairly wonky, so if you’re not the type that gets excited by telecom law, you can always skip to the part where you call your senators and representative and tell them not to repeal the FCC’s ISP privacy rules—because if we raise our voices together, we can stop Congress before it’s too late.)

Who Has Your Back?

Electronic Frontier Foundation Electronic Frontier Foundation
We live digital lives—from the videos shared on social networks, to location-aware apps on mobile phones, to log-in data for connecting to our email, to our stored documents, to our search history. The personal, the profound, and even the absurd are all transcribed into data packets, whizzing through the fiber-optic arteries of the network. Our daily lives have upgraded to the 21st century, but law and the practice of the private sector don't offer adequate protections.

To Have and to Hold. Reproduction, Marriage, and the Constitution.

Jill Lepore The New Yorker
There is a lesson in the past fifty years of litigation. When the fight for equal rights for women narrowed to a fight for reproductive rights, defended on the ground of privacy, it weakened. But when the fight for gay rights became a fight for same-sex marriage, asserted on the ground of equality, it got stronger and stronger.

United States v. Davis – Wrestling With the Third Party Doctrine

Elizabeth Goitein Just Security
Even if it were true that cell phone users “voluntarily” disclose their location, it strains credulity to argue that, simply by virtue of putting a cell phone in their pocket, they voluntarily disclose “a wealth of detail about their familial, political, professional, religious, and sexual associations.”

As Encryption Spreads, U.S. Grapples With Clash Between Privacy, Security

Ellen Nakashima and Barton Gellman Washington Post
“I don’t believe that law enforcement has an absolute right to gain access to every way in which two people may choose to communicate,” said Marc Zwillinger, “And I don’t think our Founding Fathers would think so, either. The fact that the Constitution offers a process for obtaining a search warrant where there is probable cause is not support for the notion that it should be illegal to make an unbreakable lock. These are two distinct concepts.”
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