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Media Bits and Bytes - February 19, 2019

Portside
New Report Exposes Facebook Fake News Schemes; Net Neutrality: FCC's Ajit Pai Loses in Court; The End of Amazon HQ2; Digital Pollution; New Tech for Privacy Protection; Automated Propaganda; The Ressa Case; We Interrupt This Emergency Declaration  

N.S.A. Triples Collection of Data From U.S. Phone Companies

Charlie Savage New York Times
The large and growing volume of data gathered shows that the N.S.A. continues to collect significant amounts of information about Americans’ phone and text messages after changes made by Congress in a 2015 law, the USA Freedom Act.

The Internet is Designed for Corporations, Not People

Gordon Hull The Conversation
demonstrators acting against Facebook Urban spaces are often designed as subtly hostile to certain uses. Think about seat partitions on bus terminal benches that make it harder for the homeless to sleep there or decorative leaves on railings in front of office buildings and university campuses that serve to make skateboarding dangerous.

How Robo-Callers Outwitted the Government and Completely Wrecked the Do Not Call List

Simon van Zuylen-Wood Washington Post
In 2015, the call-blocking app YouMail estimated that close to a billion robo-calls were being placed every month. Two years later, that number has leapt to 2.5 billion. At best, these calls annoy. At worst, they defraud. By far, they constitute the top consumer complaint received by the FTC.

There Is Still Hope - Even for Me

Edward Snowden, Martin Knobbe, Jörg Schindler Spiegel online
In an interview, whistleblower Edward Snowden discusses his life in Russia, the power of the intelligence apparatuses and how he will continue his battle against all-encompassing surveillance by governments.

Trump/Nunes Story Gets Weirder

Plus, Seth takes a closer look at Trump and the GOP's plan to allow Internet companies to sell people's Internet data.

Senate Republicans Just Sold You Out to Advertisers

Sam Biddle The Intercept
In a 50-to-48 vote along party lines, the U.S. Senate decided to kill FCC rules blocking your ISP from selling your browsing history to the advertising industry without permission. ISPs would not only be able to commodify your browser history, but “[hijack] their customers’ search queries and [redirect] them to a place customers hadn’t asked for” and “inject ads into your traffic based on your browsing history.
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